The North Central Soybean Research Program, a collaboration of 12 state soybean associations, invests soybean check-off funds to improve yields and profitability via university research and extension. Visit Site

View the current 2019 NCSRP-funded research projects and progress reports.

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

Thu - June 15, 2017
We conducted a review of what is known about soybean aphid — in particular, the potential effects on yield and cost-effective management for this pest.

We found that although crop and input prices have changed since the establishment of an economic threshold (ET) of 250 aphids per plant, no consistent economic gain can be found with a reduced ET for soybean aphid. This is because the ET is already set well below the aphid population level that can cause measurable yield loss.  MORE
Fri - June 9, 2017
Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR), also known as white mold of soybean, can be a significant yield-limiting disease in the north-central United States. The fungal pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most successful of all plant pathogens — with an ability to infect over 350 plant species.

We have made some significant progress in our understanding of how this pathogen is able to hijack plant defenses and cause disease — and in this process have revealed promising genetic targets for durable host resistance.   MORE
Mon - May 22, 2017
by Christian Krupke, Soybean Entomologist, Purdue University

A large, multi-state study confirmed that by the V2 stage, tissue concentrations of thiamethoxam, the neonicotinoid insecticide applied as a coating to soybean seeds, were statistically similar to plants grown from untreated seeds.

We also found that even during aphid infestations, the neonicotinoid seed treatment produced the same yields as using no insecticide at all. The IPM treatment, combining scouting and foliar-applied insecticide where necessary, resulted in significant yield increases.

The relevance of this information for soybean producers is that an IPM approach remains a better pest management investment for the soybean aphid in the north-central region, both in terms of protecting the yield potential of the crop, and in terms of break-even probability for producers.  MORE
Tue - April 18, 2017
by Gregory L. Tylka, Soybean Nematologist, Iowa State University

The ability of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) populations to reproduce on germplasm lines used in soybean breeding programs was originally measured by a test called the SCN race test. Since 2002, an adaptation of the test, called the HG type test, has been in use. Although 15 years have passed since the HG type test was introduced, confusion still exists about the concepts of SCN race and HG type. To help illustrate the concept of HG types, we drew a comparison between the current SCN HG type test and a hypothetical test for human food sensitivities that may provide a new perspective and make HG types more easily understood.  MORE