The North Central Soybean Research Program, a collaboration of 12 state soybean associations, invests soybean check-off funds to improve yields and profitability via university research and extension. Visit Site

View the current 2018 NCSRP-funded research projects and progress reports.


Tue - July 18, 2017
The soybean aphid can be controlled by Rag genes (Resistance to Aphis glycine) which have been introgressed into soybean lines adapted to Midwestern growing conditions.

Our soybean breeding program continues to develop and release soybean varieties with different combinations of Rag genes conferring aphid resistance. The University of Illinois has commercialized four soybean varieties with Rag2, one variety with Rag1, and one variety with Rag1 and Rag2 combined.   MORE
Thu - June 15, 2017
We conducted a review of what is known about soybean aphid — in particular, the potential effects on yield and cost-effective management for this pest.

We found that although crop and input prices have changed since the establishment of an economic threshold (ET) of 250 aphids per plant, no consistent economic gain can be found with a reduced ET for soybean aphid. This is because the ET is already set well below the aphid population level that can cause measurable yield loss.  MORE
Fri - June 9, 2017
Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR), also known as white mold of soybean, can be a significant yield-limiting disease in the north-central United States. The fungal pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most successful of all plant pathogens — with an ability to infect over 350 plant species.

We have made some significant progress in our understanding of how this pathogen is able to hijack plant defenses and cause disease — and in this process have revealed promising genetic targets for durable host resistance.   MORE